How to help your children learn to think

http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=child+thinking&start=79&hl=en&sa=X&biw=1440&bih=785&addh=36&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=ekNMzqrodIHp5M:&imgrefurl=http://www.parentingontrack.com/parents/thinking-children/&docid=el8BfADA8sqIKM&imgurl=http://www.parentingontrack.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/thinking_kid-238x300.jpg&w=238&h=300&ei=-S2ZT_vJH6a1iQetodSEBg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=978&vpy=305&dur=2653&hovh=240&hovw=190&tx=126&ty=160&sig=113661687895486570188&page=3&tbnh=149&tbnw=127&ndsp=42&ved=1t:429,r:14,s:79,i:34I made it all the way to the end of Quiet Leadership today, after taking way too long to get through it, but it was worth the wait for the chapter entitled 'Using the Six Steps with Children'. Here are just a few of the best quotes.

"From about age seven, children only learn when they want to, no matter how many times you say something... We need to get them doing more of the thinking instead of just telling them what to do."

"There is a direct and proven correlation between the amount of delight a mother exhibits when her offspring does something new and the future intelligence of the child. Feedback generally isn't just helpful, it's essential to our well-being."

"When we realise we've been using an approach with our kids that's doomed to fail, like trying to tell them what to do, perhaps the best thing to do is just apologise. Apologising can pull the rug out from underneath emotional tension, bringing intimacy back into a difficult relationship."

After a case study: "By taking M through a process of discovering her own answers, the mother did a great job of helping M be the best she could be, while deepening the trust and respect in their relationship."

 

Surely all you parents are just going to run out and buy this book now, right?